Category Archives: Egypt

Medieval Armenian Sibylline Traditions comprising the “Defloratio Berosi” of Giovanni Nanni

(Johannes Annius) (§§884-891)

  1. Go to §885, below, >>, for a translation of the Defloratio Berosi, and to §891, below, >>, for the original Latin. The Defloratio Berosi Chaldaica, to give it its full title, was divided into five books. These, according to Nanni’s preface to the Defloratio (fol. CIVb), were addressed in their original form to the Athenians, and were intended to correct perceived errors in their accounts of ancient history. Berossus is known to have been well received by philosophers in Athens towards the end of his life, after he had moved his residence from Babylon to the Aegean island of Cos. (Pliny, Nat Hist. VII. xxxvii [123].) The Defloratio differed in the above respects from the “Babyloniaka” of Berossus, several excerpts of which have been preserved by ancient authors: the “Babyloniaka” was divided into three books, not five, and was dedicated to Antiochus II Theos, the king of Seleucid Babylon when Berossus was still present in that city, before he moved to Cos and was honored at Athens. This is one of the principal reasons why the Defloratio was rejected in the Renaissance: it was presumed it was claiming to be the “Babyloniaka” of Berossus, and it was known from the surviving fragments of the latter that the presumption was mistaken. However, the Hebrew Sibyl known as the “daughter Berossus” may well have drawn on the writings of her priestly “father,” including the sources of the “Babyloniaka,” to compose “Summary Extracts (Defloratio) from Berosus (Berosi),” — as the title of the work should perhaps be translated, — of relevance to the historical inquiries of the Athenians. It was alleged the Hebrew Sibyl was born in Syria of Manasseh (a Hebrew name) by Papilia, a female related to Alexander of Macedon, and that she migrated subsequently to Cumae in Italy. (Vaticinium Sibyllae, MGH SS 22, p. 376.) The Sibylline hypothesis is reasonable: it harmonizes with what we know otherwise of her work. The chief reasons for classing the Defloratio Berosi as a medieval Sibylline fragment are, therefore, as follows:

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Sir Isaac Newton on ancient history

Compiled By Brian Forbes

Sir Isaac Newton, a father of physics, who discovered the math of gravity, was interested in early history. He summarized it by saying that kings were made into gods by their citizens. Kings of cities were deified by their cities, and kings of nations by their nations.

He said that this practice didn’t happen over time from the bottom up, but right away from the top down. He said that the original religion was given by Noah, but Mercury changed all that in honor of Osiris & Isis. He said that the historians of Egypt made the gods more ancient than they really were, and that many were ruling during the reign of king David of Israel. Continue reading Sir Isaac Newton on ancient history

What Did Sanchoniathon, Phoenicia’s Ancient Historian, Write?

PIC BYBLOS LEBANON – courtesy onemilegrads.blogspot

Sanchuniathon, (flourished 13th century BC?), ancient Phoenician writer. All information about him is derived from the works of Philo of Byblos (flourished ad 100). Excavations at Ras Shamra (ancient Ugarit) in Syria in 1929 revealed Phoenician documents supporting much of Sanchuniathon’s information on Phoenician mythology and religious beliefs. According to Philo, Sanchuniathon derived the sacred lore from inscriptions on the Ammouneis (i.e., images or pillars of Baal Amon), which stood in Phoenician temples.
  — From Encyclopædia Britannica.

Eusebius says that Philo placed Sanchuniathon’s works into nine books. In the introduction to the first book he makes this preface concerning Sanchuniathon:

“These things being so, Sanchuniathon, who was a man of much learning and great curiosity, and desirous of knowing the earliest history of all nations from the creation of the world, searched out with great care the history of Taautus, knowing that of all men under the sun Taautus was the first who thought of the invention of letters, and began the writing of records: and he laid the foundation, as it were, of his history, by beginning with him, whom the Egyptians called Thoyth, and the Alexandrians Thoth, translated by the Greeks into Hermes.”

The following translation is from I. P. Cory’s Ancient Fragments (1828/1832). Cory has provided citations for the passages in Eusebius’ work from which this epitome of Sanchuniathon has been reconstructed.

Continue reading What Did Sanchoniathon, Phoenicia’s Ancient Historian, Write?

Another Cover Up in Egypt – A short Shocking Video

This is the so-called “Unfinished Northern Pyramid of Zawyet El Aryan.” It doesn’t look like a pyramid at all, and is in fact in the shape of a parallelogram. Not only that, it is totally off limits by the Egyptian authorities, not only for tourists, but even for Egyptologists and archaeologists! Why!

Carved through solid bedrock more than 75ft (25 M.) down – the Egyptian government has chosen literally to cover-up this site… and with what and how will certainly upset you. Just how could the dynastic Egyptians possibly have done this jaw dropping structure?

We have no idea. But it is an amazing construction that should upset any Egyptologist. Where are the voices of protest? OR… did they find something in there that contradicts the favorite narratives of mainstream history?

It happened in France, where one so-called Caveman’s cave was closed to the public, ostensibly, because there were pictures of men with dinosaurs together! And, -as the enlightened ones among you already know – that just doesn’t fit the usual propaganda.  What are your thoughts on the subject?