Tag Archives: Armenia

Tour Armenia Speaks About Noya or Noah

Tour Armenia discusses the Armenian history of Noah and interesting descent from their patriarchs Haik & Togarmah or Torcom, in spite of way too ancient dating.

 

The story of Noya (Noah) forms the basis of Armenia’s Christian religious identity, but in fact there is no recorded account of the Flood in ancestral Armenian mythology until the kingdom of Urartu and later, Christianity. Of all ancestral peoples who left records of their living in the region, there is not one single account of the Flood, which is widespread among other cultures in the region.

The reason for this is simple, if one believes the account of the biblical flood and subsequent regeneration of the human race:

According to the biblical timeline the Armenians are direct descendants of Japheth, one the grandsons of Noah, whose ark landed on the top of Mount Ararat after the Great Flood. During the deluge Noah’s ark came to rest on the Mountains of Ararat, and his sons and grandsons whose progeny increased there had to emigrate to other lands. While some of Japheth’s sons stayed in the vicinity of Ararat, the others went towards Mesopotamia. Haik, who was believed to one of Japheth’s grandsons and the heroic patriarch of the Armenian people, was among those who went to Babylon. Another offspring, Aram, is credited with founding the Syrian kingdom.

“Now these are the generations of the sons of Noah; Shem, Ham and Japheth: and unto them were sons born after the flood.

“The son of Japheth; Gomer, and Magog, and Madai, and Javan and Tubal, and Meshech, and Tiras.

“And the sons of Gomer; Ashkenaz, and Riphath, and Togarmah”.

Armenians consider themselves as coming from the House of Togarmah or Torcom. There is a cuneiform inscription that refers to the walled town of Tilgarimnu near Malatia in ancient Armenia. Others think that Togarmah is made up from two words: “take” (meaning tribe or race in Sanskrit) and “Armah” (Armenia).

Of course some of you may want to suspend some archeological facts for a little mythical belief. However, considering the discovery of Troy was pointed to by a story of the “mythical” Trojan War (which is now known to have actually occurred), and the Old Testament has been more and more shown to indicate actual history, perhaps this timeline does not need to be treated so much as legend but as a symbolic representation of actual events.

For example, there was a flood that covered much of the world around 13,600 BC as the world warmed through a tilting of its rotational axis, causing glaciers to melt. The Bible speaks of the mountain Noah lands on as Ararat or Alarod. In the Aramaic version of Genesis, the bible doesn’t speak of Noah landing on ‘the mountain of Ararat’, but on ‘the mountains (plural) of Ararat’. Later cultures called the region Urartu or Arata. These different words describe the same place.

The consequent raising of seawater inundated all of the lowlands in the Near East. Some speculation is made that rather than being seen as an actual boat, Noah’s ark can be considered as a symbolic embodiment of life (the ark of the covenant, for example, existed both as a thing and as an idea–the compact between God and man). Continue reading Tour Armenia Speaks About Noya or Noah

Medieval Armenian Sibylline Traditions comprising the “Defloratio Berosi” of Giovanni Nanni

(Johannes Annius) (§§884-891)

  1. Go to §885, below, >>, for a translation of the Defloratio Berosi, and to §891, below, >>, for the original Latin. The Defloratio Berosi Chaldaica, to give it its full title, was divided into five books. These, according to Nanni’s preface to the Defloratio (fol. CIVb), were addressed in their original form to the Athenians, and were intended to correct perceived errors in their accounts of ancient history. Berossus is known to have been well received by philosophers in Athens towards the end of his life, after he had moved his residence from Babylon to the Aegean island of Cos. (Pliny, Nat Hist. VII. xxxvii [123].) The Defloratio differed in the above respects from the “Babyloniaka” of Berossus, several excerpts of which have been preserved by ancient authors: the “Babyloniaka” was divided into three books, not five, and was dedicated to Antiochus II Theos, the king of Seleucid Babylon when Berossus was still present in that city, before he moved to Cos and was honored at Athens. This is one of the principal reasons why the Defloratio was rejected in the Renaissance: it was presumed it was claiming to be the “Babyloniaka” of Berossus, and it was known from the surviving fragments of the latter that the presumption was mistaken. However, the Hebrew Sibyl known as the “daughter Berossus” may well have drawn on the writings of her priestly “father,” including the sources of the “Babyloniaka,” to compose “Summary Extracts (Defloratio) from Berosus (Berosi),” — as the title of the work should perhaps be translated, — of relevance to the historical inquiries of the Athenians. It was alleged the Hebrew Sibyl was born in Syria of Manasseh (a Hebrew name) by Papilia, a female related to Alexander of Macedon, and that she migrated subsequently to Cumae in Italy. (Vaticinium Sibyllae, MGH SS 22, p. 376.) The Sibylline hypothesis is reasonable: it harmonizes with what we know otherwise of her work. The chief reasons for classing the Defloratio Berosi as a medieval Sibylline fragment are, therefore, as follows:

Continue reading Medieval Armenian Sibylline Traditions comprising the “Defloratio Berosi” of Giovanni Nanni

World’s oldest winery discovered in Armenian cave

armenia-wine-269x300by Lu Paradise • January 17, 2011 • 2 Comments  •  248 views

PP EDITOR

This is some more amazing 5 days old news, corroborating the discovery of Noah’s Ark in former Armenian Uruartu or Ararat mountains, where Noah’s Ark landed. According to wine experts and wine scientists, the wine cultivation has always been known as having originated in Armenia, where the Bible book Genesis reports Noah as having planted a vineyard after he landed there with his ark. He produced his first wine harvest and promptly got drunk, and was treated disrespectfully by his son Ham, who looked on his father’s nakedness in the privacy of his tent.

It is fantastic how real history brings out and confirms the details of Biblical history. Enjoy! Only their dating methods may be a little bit off, as according to the consensus of most scholars, the Ark landed approximately 4,500 years ago. They date it 1,500 years older. Well, it’s pretty darn close! I’d say. Continue reading World’s oldest winery discovered in Armenian cave

The History of Hayk, Abgar & the Early Armenians

Hayk

Etymology of Hayk

The name of the patriarch, Հայկ Hayk is not exactly homophonous with the name for “Armenia”, Հայք Hayk’. Հայք Hayk’ is the nominative plural in Classical Armenian of հայ (hay), the Armenian term for “Armenian.”[1] Some claim that the etymology of Hayq’ (Հայք) from Hayk (Հայկ) is impossible[1] and that origin of the term Hay (“Armenian”) is verifiable.[1] Nevertheless, Hayk and Haig are usually[how?] connected to hay (հայ) and hayer (հայեր, the nominative plural in Modern Armenian), the self-designation of the Armenians.

Hayk would then be an aitiological founding figure, like e.g. Asshur for the Assyrians, etc. One of Hayk’s most famous scions, Aram, settled in Eastern Armenia from the Mitanni kingdom (Western Armenia), when Sargon II mentions a king of part of Armenia who bore the (ArmenianIndo-Iranian) name Bagatadi (“Theodore”).[2]

A connection was made in Armenian historiography of the Soviet era, with Hayasa mentioned in Hittite inscriptions.[3]

The Armenian word haykakan or haigagan (Armenian: հայկական, meaning “that which pertains to Armenians”) finds its stem in this progenitor. Continue reading The History of Hayk, Abgar & the Early Armenians