Tag Archives: Brutus

Nennius on the descendants of the Patriarch Yapheth

nenniushistorybrittonumThe English translation of the Latin Text of Nennius 17 and 18 by Annomundi.com

Translation from Latin (below)

Nennius, also known as Nemnius or Nemnivus, was a Welsh monk of the 9th century. He has traditionally been attributed with the authorship of the Historia Brittonum, based on the prologue affixed to that work.
Nennius was a student of Elvodugus, commonly identified with the bishop Elfodd who convinced British ecclesiastics to accept the Continental dating for Easter, and who died in 809 according to the Annales Cambriae.
Nennius is believed to have lived in the area made up by present-day Brecknockshire and Radnorshire counties in Powys, Wales. He lived outside the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, isolated by mountains in a rural society. Welsh traditions include Nennius with Elbodug and others said to have escaped the massacre of Welsh monks by Ethelfrid in 613, fleeing to the north. Continue reading Nennius on the descendants of the Patriarch Yapheth

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The Chronicles of the early Britons – Bill Cooper

BrutusChapter 4  After the Flood,
by Bill Cooper

‘Yf God will, at an other apter tyme and in more apt place, marveilous agreement of the historyes of Antiquity and great unlooked for light and credit will be restored to the Originalls of Brutus…’ (John Dee 1577. Cotton MS. Vitellius. c. vii. f 206v)

On Wednesday 7th November 1917, Flinders Petrie, a renowned archaeologist of the day, addressed the assembled members of the British Academy. He was to present a paper to them entitled Neglected British History, (1) in which he drew attention to the fact that a considerable body of historical documentary source-material was being overlooked if not willfully ignored by modern historians. He drew fleeting attention to the work of Geoffrey of Monmouth and then homed in on one particular record that shed much light upon Geoffrey’s too-disparaged history.

Tysillo The ancient book to which he drew attention was known to him as the Tysilio Chronicle, which is listed today as Jesus College MS LXI and is lodged in the Bodleian Library, Oxford. It is written in medieval Welsh, and is, as its colophon reveals, (2) a translation that was commissioned by the same Walter of Oxford who commissioned Geoffrey of Monmouth to translate a certain very ancient British book into Latin. It is, in fact, a translation from early British into medieval Welsh of the same source-material used by Geoffrey, and is an answer to all those learned critics who have stated with such emphasis over the years that Geoffrey of Monmouth was lying when he claimed to have translated such a book. Continue reading The Chronicles of the early Britons – Bill Cooper

History of Early British Kings After the Flood Quackademics Don’t Like

kingsofbritain-bannerAfter the Flood, by Bill Cooper  Chapter 5
More Forbidden History!

AUGUSTINE OF CANTERBURY

What follows is a summary of the history of the early kings of the early Britons as it is given in both Geoffrey of Monmouth and the Welsh chronicles. It is a recorded history that was consigned to oblivion after the massacre, at the instigation of Augustine, of the British monks at Bangor in AD 604 and was thus entirely unknown or ignored by the later Saxon and Norman chroniclers of England.

Consequently, it came to be generally and unquestioningly assumed amongst English scholars by the 16th and 17th centuries that no such record had ever existed, and that works such as Geoffrey of Monmouth’s or the Welsh chronicle were forgeries and fairy tales. That opinion persists today. We have seen, however, in the previous chapter how these records enjoy a great deal of historical vindication in spite of modernism’s cursory and fashionable dismissal of them. Continue reading History of Early British Kings After the Flood Quackademics Don’t Like

Real Welsh Origins & ‘Only Boys Aloud’ Praise God in Celtic Song (English lyrics)

October 7, 2012 |  By Lu Paradise — 79 total views

These Welsh boys sing beautifully about God in their interesting native language! Today’s Welsh language emerged in the 6th century from British, the common ancestor of Welsh, Breton, Cornish, and the extinct language known as Cumbric or Cymraeg. Anyway, a great choir and song glorifying God for a change! Enjoy! But did you know that the Welsh are not allowed to know about their own pre-Roman history, by mainstream Historians, Wickedpedia, nor Google?

Where Does Term ‘Welsh’ Come From? Continue reading Real Welsh Origins & ‘Only Boys Aloud’ Praise God in Celtic Song (English lyrics)