Tag Archives: Tysilio Chronicle

The Chronicles of the early Britons – Bill Cooper

BrutusChapter 4  After the Flood,
by Bill Cooper

‘Yf God will, at an other apter tyme and in more apt place, marveilous agreement of the historyes of Antiquity and great unlooked for light and credit will be restored to the Originalls of Brutus…’ (John Dee 1577. Cotton MS. Vitellius. c. vii. f 206v)

On Wednesday 7th November 1917, Flinders Petrie, a renowned archaeologist of the day, addressed the assembled members of the British Academy. He was to present a paper to them entitled Neglected British History, (1) in which he drew attention to the fact that a considerable body of historical documentary source-material was being overlooked if not willfully ignored by modern historians. He drew fleeting attention to the work of Geoffrey of Monmouth and then homed in on one particular record that shed much light upon Geoffrey’s too-disparaged history.

Tysillo The ancient book to which he drew attention was known to him as the Tysilio Chronicle, which is listed today as Jesus College MS LXI and is lodged in the Bodleian Library, Oxford. It is written in medieval Welsh, and is, as its colophon reveals, (2) a translation that was commissioned by the same Walter of Oxford who commissioned Geoffrey of Monmouth to translate a certain very ancient British book into Latin. It is, in fact, a translation from early British into medieval Welsh of the same source-material used by Geoffrey, and is an answer to all those learned critics who have stated with such emphasis over the years that Geoffrey of Monmouth was lying when he claimed to have translated such a book. Continue reading The Chronicles of the early Britons – Bill Cooper

From Noah to Hercules – What History Says about Early Man

By Brian Forbes

If you have several hours to skim a very interesting topic, you’re in the right place. If you only have 5 minutes to give me, please don’t start here. Start with the Summary on the origin of mankind. This book has been formatted and abridged for internet viewing.  For an  unabridged copy, please follow the “Purchase” link here. (Note: If you can’t afford to buy it, send me a request for a free copy.)    [Links below article]

The World as We Know It

A Description of Early Man

It is a known fact that the earth is 4.5 billion years old.  We’re not allowed to question it anymore.  Everyone who knows their science knows with certainty that the earth is 4.5 billion years old. In fact, they say it so often that people have stopped using “billions of years” and started abbreviating it as byr. A billion years is a long time.

Can you believe that of the 4.5 byrs of Earth’s history, man has only been man for 200,000 years? It’s true. Don’t scorn! Scientists, as I write this, are all (nearly) unanimous that man has been around since 200,000 years ago. It’s verifiable, experimental, solid, unchanging science! Before about four thousand years ago, our ancestors had trouble being modern. People nearly as smart as you, living nearly as long as you, didn’t build the structures we do. They didn’t know how to plant crops. They didn’t travel beyond a few miles from home. They even had a hard time creating watercraft sufficient to carry them beyond the sight of land. You may not realize this, but once I say it, you will. Two hundred thousand years is not only a long time, it’s a very, very long time.

If you are reading this, you more than likely are of childbearing age. A human generation can be as short as 10 years, but if we are being generous, we would double it. Humans have been around, doing their thing, populating the earth, and figuring out what makes us alive for literally 10,000 generations. That means, just in the human line, you have ten thousand mothers and ten thousand fathers. Continue reading From Noah to Hercules – What History Says about Early Man