Tag Archives: Eusebius

What Did Sanchoniathon, Phoenicia’s Ancient Historian, Write?

PIC BYBLOS LEBANON – courtesy onemilegrads.blogspot

Sanchuniathon, (flourished 13th century BC?), ancient Phoenician writer. All information about him is derived from the works of Philo of Byblos (flourished ad 100). Excavations at Ras Shamra (ancient Ugarit) in Syria in 1929 revealed Phoenician documents supporting much of Sanchuniathon’s information on Phoenician mythology and religious beliefs. According to Philo, Sanchuniathon derived the sacred lore from inscriptions on the Ammouneis (i.e., images or pillars of Baal Amon), which stood in Phoenician temples.
  — From Encyclopædia Britannica.

Eusebius says that Philo placed Sanchuniathon’s works into nine books. In the introduction to the first book he makes this preface concerning Sanchuniathon:

“These things being so, Sanchuniathon, who was a man of much learning and great curiosity, and desirous of knowing the earliest history of all nations from the creation of the world, searched out with great care the history of Taautus, knowing that of all men under the sun Taautus was the first who thought of the invention of letters, and began the writing of records: and he laid the foundation, as it were, of his history, by beginning with him, whom the Egyptians called Thoyth, and the Alexandrians Thoth, translated by the Greeks into Hermes.”

The following translation is from I. P. Cory’s Ancient Fragments (1828/1832). Cory has provided citations for the passages in Eusebius’ work from which this epitome of Sanchuniathon has been reconstructed.

Continue reading What Did Sanchoniathon, Phoenicia’s Ancient Historian, Write?

Full Text of Eusebius’ Chronicle Chronicon Proving the Patriarchs & the Flood

[i] Eusebius, (ca. 263-ca. 339) author of the Chronicle translated below, was a major Christian author and cleric of the fourth century. His other writings, many of which have survived, include the Ecclesiastical History, the Life of Constantine, historical, martyrological, apologetic, dogmatic, exegetical, and miscellaneous works. Although originally written in Greek, his important Chronicle (Chronography, or Chronicon) has survived fully only in an Armenian translation of the 5th century, of which our present edition is a translation. A fifth century Latin translation (known as Jerome’s Chronicle) contains only the second part of Eusebius’ two-part work, namely the chronological tables which accompany the text of Book One. Nonetheless, the Latin translation of the chronological tables is invaluable, since the beginning and ending of the corresponding Armenian parts of Book Two are damaged. Reflecting 5th century Armenia’s multi-lingual cultural milieu, Eusebius’ Chronicle initially was translated into Armenian from the original Greek, then corrected using a Syriac edition. During the same period Eusebius’ other influential work, the Ecclesiastical History, was translated into Armenian from the Syriac. From almost the moment of their translation, Eusebius’ works played an important role in the development of Armenian historical writing.

Many of Eusebius’ extant Greek texts were written while the author worked at the library in Caesarea Palestina founded by the scholar Origen (ca. 185–ca. 254), where he had access to numerous works of antiquity which have not survived. Eusebius’ welcome technique of including sometimes lengthy passages from such lost works guaranteed his writings an important place in historical literature, quite apart from his impressive literary and analytical abilities. These general characteristics of Eusebius’ work are particularly highlighted in the Chronicle. The Chronicle was the ancient world’s first systematic, chronologically sound, universal history. It begins with the earliest extant written records available to our author and continues to his own day, that is to the year 325.

Among the sources cited and often quoted from at length are Berosus, Alexander Polyhistor, Abydenus, Josephus, Castor, Diodorus, Cephalion, various named translations of the Bible, the writings of Manetho, Porphyrius, and others. In a brief introduction, Eusebius describes the plan of his work. He proposes to give a prose description of salient events and personalities from the civilizations of the Chaldeans, Assyrians, Medes, Lydians, Persians, Hebrews, Egyptians, and Greeks, plus listings of the Greek Olympiads, and the rulers of the Greek city-states, the Macedonians, and Romans. Continue reading Full Text of Eusebius’ Chronicle Chronicon Proving the Patriarchs & the Flood

Pagan Gods Were Mortal Men

group-of-godsFrom Noah to Hercules by Brian Forbes  • May 21, 2015 • 0 Comments • 110 views • Summary:

There is a unanimous ancient perspective that directly contradicts the theory of evolution. It is being ignored by scholars in the modern day. Many pagan gods were mortal men. They were born, waged war, conferred advantages, had children, and died, whereupon they were deified by their descendants.

The theory of evolution is easily refuted by many powerful arguments and proofs. The watchmaker argument is perhaps the oldest and most famous. The Mt. St. Helen’s evidence, as a template for stratification and the carving of canyons, can be boiled down to a few sentences and photographs.

StHelensGrandCanyon

The kings of many European tribes can trace their genealogies back to Noah.[1] Another evidence that is of this caliber, which has yet to be given its proper place in the origins debate, is that of the common ancestry of all men through the “gods” of pagan (especially Greek and Roman) mythology.

At first glance this concept, that many to most pagan gods were mortal men, seems highly speculative – a conspiracy theory on a government protest website. It is not wild speculation. On the contrary, this was a position taken by nearly all historians of antiquity. The most skeptical, naturalistic authors were not ambiguous on this point, and there was very little deviation. This is my opinion, but you don’t have to accept it because of me.

The opinion of an un-credentialed spectator means little in this scholarly, pompous world. That is why I aim to bring you the opinion of these ancient authors in their own words. The experts of antiquity will show that Darwinism does not match the traditions of Paganism, Judaism, or any other ancient perspective on the origin of mankind. Continue reading Pagan Gods Were Mortal Men

From Noah to Hercules – What History Says about Early Man

By Brian Forbes

If you have several hours to skim a very interesting topic, you’re in the right place. If you only have 5 minutes to give me, please don’t start here. Start with the Summary on the origin of mankind. This book has been formatted and abridged for internet viewing.  For an  unabridged copy, please follow the “Purchase” link here. (Note: If you can’t afford to buy it, send me a request for a free copy.)    [Links below article]

The World as We Know It

A Description of Early Man

It is a known fact that the earth is 4.5 billion years old.  We’re not allowed to question it anymore.  Everyone who knows their science knows with certainty that the earth is 4.5 billion years old. In fact, they say it so often that people have stopped using “billions of years” and started abbreviating it as byr. A billion years is a long time.

Can you believe that of the 4.5 byrs of Earth’s history, man has only been man for 200,000 years? It’s true. Don’t scorn! Scientists, as I write this, are all (nearly) unanimous that man has been around since 200,000 years ago. It’s verifiable, experimental, solid, unchanging science! Before about four thousand years ago, our ancestors had trouble being modern. People nearly as smart as you, living nearly as long as you, didn’t build the structures we do. They didn’t know how to plant crops. They didn’t travel beyond a few miles from home. They even had a hard time creating watercraft sufficient to carry them beyond the sight of land. You may not realize this, but once I say it, you will. Two hundred thousand years is not only a long time, it’s a very, very long time.

If you are reading this, you more than likely are of childbearing age. A human generation can be as short as 10 years, but if we are being generous, we would double it. Humans have been around, doing their thing, populating the earth, and figuring out what makes us alive for literally 10,000 generations. That means, just in the human line, you have ten thousand mothers and ten thousand fathers. Continue reading From Noah to Hercules – What History Says about Early Man