Medieval Armenian Sibylline Traditions comprising the “Defloratio Berosi” of Giovanni Nanni

(Johannes Annius) (§§884-891)

  1. Go to §885, below, >>, for a translation of the Defloratio Berosi, and to §891, below, >>, for the original Latin. The Defloratio Berosi Chaldaica, to give it its full title, was divided into five books. These, according to Nanni’s preface to the Defloratio (fol. CIVb), were addressed in their original form to the Athenians, and were intended to correct perceived errors in their accounts of ancient history. Berossus is known to have been well received by philosophers in Athens towards the end of his life, after he had moved his residence from Babylon to the Aegean island of Cos. (Pliny, Nat Hist. VII. xxxvii [123].) The Defloratio differed in the above respects from the “Babyloniaka” of Berossus, several excerpts of which have been preserved by ancient authors: the “Babyloniaka” was divided into three books, not five, and was dedicated to Antiochus II Theos, the king of Seleucid Babylon when Berossus was still present in that city, before he moved to Cos and was honored at Athens. This is one of the principal reasons why the Defloratio was rejected in the Renaissance: it was presumed it was claiming to be the “Babyloniaka” of Berossus, and it was known from the surviving fragments of the latter that the presumption was mistaken. However, the Hebrew Sibyl known as the “daughter Berossus” may well have drawn on the writings of her priestly “father,” including the sources of the “Babyloniaka,” to compose “Summary Extracts (Defloratio) from Berosus (Berosi),” — as the title of the work should perhaps be translated, — of relevance to the historical inquiries of the Athenians. It was alleged the Hebrew Sibyl was born in Syria of Manasseh (a Hebrew name) by Papilia, a female related to Alexander of Macedon, and that she migrated subsequently to Cumae in Italy. (Vaticinium Sibyllae, MGH SS 22, p. 376.) The Sibylline hypothesis is reasonable: it harmonizes with what we know otherwise of her work. The chief reasons for classing the Defloratio Berosi as a medieval Sibylline fragment are, therefore, as follows:

Continue reading Medieval Armenian Sibylline Traditions comprising the “Defloratio Berosi” of Giovanni Nanni

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ENGLISH TRANSLATION OF THE DEFLORATIO BEROSI CHALDAICA.

884.6. The original Latin of the Defloratio Berosi follows the translation at §891, below, >>. The first section of the translation, through the earlier part of Book Five of the Defloratio, is by Salverté (Essai historique et philosophique sur les noms d’hommes, de peuples et de lieux, E. Salverté, tome II, Paris 1824, p. 369ff.), as translated from French into English by Mordaque, and modified here, on occasion, to correct obvious errors, or to reflect the original better; the remainder of Book Five, left untranslated by Salverté, and therefore also by Mordaque, is my own rendering. The English translation of Salverté by Mordaque is from the “History of the Names of Men, Nations and Places, in their connection with the Progress of Civilization. Translated from the French of Eusebius Salverté by Rev. L. H. Mordaque, M.A., Oxon.,” vol II, London 1864, p. 295ff. Salverté’s translation was of the text of the Defloratio Berosi itself, as transcribed by Nanni from the book obtained in Armenia and given to him in Italy by the monk George. Salverté did not translate Nanni’s commentary on the Defloratio Berosi. The Defloratio Berosi and the accompanying commentary forms Book XV of Nanni’s Antiquitates. Nanni’s extensive commentary is not included in this translation either, except in a few instances, so references in “The Six Days of Creation” to the Defloratio (in the 1512 edition of the Antiquitates in Latin, published by Joannes Paruus and Jodocus Badius), or to other sections of the Antiquitates not found here, can be presumed to be part of the commentary on the Defloratio itself, or to be extracted from other works and/or accompanying commentaries contained in the Antiquitates. My own notes are contained within braces { }.

DEFLORATIO BEROSI CHALDAICA

Complete translation from Latin to English:

  1. “THE FIRST BOOK

Before the well-known disaster by which the whole world perished beneath the waters, many centuries had elapsed, the records of which have been faithfully preserved by our Chaldeans. According to their writings, there lived in those days a race of giants, in a city of great size, called Enos {= Enoch} near Mount Lebanon, which was the seat of empire over the whole world, from the rising of the sun to its setting. Trusting in their strength and colossal size, these giants made themselves weapons, and oppressed their neighbors all around. Wholly given up to a life of indulgence, they invented tents, instruments of music, and everything which contributes to pleasure. Continue reading ENGLISH TRANSLATION OF THE DEFLORATIO BEROSI CHALDAICA.

How Rockefeller & Carnegy Conquered World & Changed History Science

The Rockefeller & Carnegy influence on and corruption of American historical academia is told in part 3 of this video. MUST WATCH!!! Use the CC button to see the text of the video when you don’t hear or understand so well.

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WickedPedia Deletes Paleontologist Turned Intelligent Design

“Naughty, naughty! Shouldn’t do that! Goes against our religion! Away with you, rebel, breaking ranks like that with all of us hoodwinked, money corrupted Darwinian sycophants who spurned real science (knowledge) for fancy fables. You should hang! Is your name Galileo, by chance? Ah, he is German on top of it.  INQUISITION!!!!  INQUISITION!!!! INQUISITION!!!! …..Where are those bastards, when you need them, to gulag an inconvenient truther, or better, exterminate a NON politically correct, populist, fascist, capitalist, misogynist, homophobic, pseudo academic….” Hello?”

Shows you, that you are what you read! And you read what you prefer! And you prefer what you CHOOSE! And you choose either the inconvenient TRUTH or a state supported comfortable lie. So you either spiritually die for a lie, OR we move with the truth! Which do you? Continue reading WickedPedia Deletes Paleontologist Turned Intelligent Design

Dr. Henry Bauer, Why We Shouldn’t Trust Science [Esp. Historical Science]

Just under an hour- Absolutely worth listening to! via Skeptiko with many thanks for providing a great interview so freely
Listen Now: Podcast: Play in new window | Download

Henry Bauer: We have to be skeptical about what scientists say, because what scientists tell you is not necessarily the same as what science can tell you.

A selection of quotes from the interview

Henry Bauer: Right, thanks. I was turned on to science in high school and I studied chemistry and I taught chemistry and did research in chemistry [he is emeritus professor of chemistry and science studies, and emeritus dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, “Virginia Tech”]

Henry Bauer: Exactly, thank you. The thing is that even as science is accepted as being the hallmark of a true understanding, the fact of the matter is, the history of science shows quite clearly that scientific consensus, at any point in time, can’t be accepted as absolutely correct. Continue reading Dr. Henry Bauer, Why We Shouldn’t Trust Science [Esp. Historical Science]

Sir Isaac Newton on ancient history

Compiled By Brian Forbes

Sir Isaac Newton, a father of physics, who discovered the math of gravity, was interested in early history. He summarized it by saying that kings were made into gods by their citizens. Kings of cities were deified by their cities, and kings of nations by their nations.

He said that this practice didn’t happen over time from the bottom up, but right away from the top down. He said that the original religion was given by Noah, but Mercury changed all that in honor of Osiris & Isis. He said that the historians of Egypt made the gods more ancient than they really were, and that many were ruling during the reign of king David of Israel. Continue reading Sir Isaac Newton on ancient history

What Did Sanchoniathon, Phoenicia’s Ancient Historian, Write?

PIC BYBLOS LEBANON – courtesy onemilegrads.blogspot

Sanchuniathon, (flourished 13th century BC?), ancient Phoenician writer. All information about him is derived from the works of Philo of Byblos (flourished ad 100). Excavations at Ras Shamra (ancient Ugarit) in Syria in 1929 revealed Phoenician documents supporting much of Sanchuniathon’s information on Phoenician mythology and religious beliefs. According to Philo, Sanchuniathon derived the sacred lore from inscriptions on the Ammouneis (i.e., images or pillars of Baal Amon), which stood in Phoenician temples.
  — From Encyclopædia Britannica.

Eusebius says that Philo placed Sanchuniathon’s works into nine books. In the introduction to the first book he makes this preface concerning Sanchuniathon:

“These things being so, Sanchuniathon, who was a man of much learning and great curiosity, and desirous of knowing the earliest history of all nations from the creation of the world, searched out with great care the history of Taautus, knowing that of all men under the sun Taautus was the first who thought of the invention of letters, and began the writing of records: and he laid the foundation, as it were, of his history, by beginning with him, whom the Egyptians called Thoyth, and the Alexandrians Thoth, translated by the Greeks into Hermes.”

The following translation is from I. P. Cory’s Ancient Fragments (1828/1832). Cory has provided citations for the passages in Eusebius’ work from which this epitome of Sanchuniathon has been reconstructed.

Continue reading What Did Sanchoniathon, Phoenicia’s Ancient Historian, Write?

Jabal ‘Amelat The History Through Eponyms in South Lebanon B.C.

Jabal ‘Amelat By Dr. Youssef el-Hourani

Introduction
Wherever we go in South Lebanon, we find ourselves surrounded by traces and footprints of ancient civilizations. If we are interested in studying history through language, with whoever we talk of the inhabitants of that area, we find still alive something to remind us of those who once lived there. Man’s story in Jabal ‘Amelat in South Lebanon, began long before History. The natural shelters, like those picturesque caves in the “Zahrani” river valley, testify to man’s existence by means of his implements and primitive elaborations, notwithstanding the fact that archeologists have not yet reached all the historically important sites there.

The mountains, hills, valleys, meadows, slopes, springs, fountains, rivers, natural shelters, and everything in that neighborhood, were attractive to a man looking for a land fit to be his home, and afford him protection, not only against foes, but also against the hardiness of nature found in other lands. Here everything and every event is moderate, and invites man to start a social life by building hamlets, villages and sanctuaries which he could bequeath to his successors.
That the nature of the land supported a social life in a continuous manner since thousands of years, is witnessed by the continuous use of very ancient names for the ruins and localities, small valleys and petty springs…

Convinced as we are of the existence of a very early and sustained social life in Southern Lebanon, we were able to appreciate the importance of eponyms designating villages or localities as clues for the study of the civilizations and cultures of the area.
When we use names that we consider well-known eponyms, we do not bother, as some scholars do, to give linguistic explanations. That is because our aim is not to investigate every name found on the map, but to choose only the names that are unequivocal and supported by evidences from historical texts, traditions or other data; such as the presence elsewhere in the area of names belonging to the same culture. Therefore, we refer to many cultures by means of the names of localities they once occupied. Continue reading Jabal ‘Amelat The History Through Eponyms in South Lebanon B.C.

Ivy league profs warns of the vice of conformism: “Think for yourself”


This is a good sign.  Fifteen Ivy league professors have offered advice and a warning to students everywhere –to recapture the spirit of truthseeking and free debate. The message might just catch on, because although the young strive to conform to fashionable norms, approximately none of them want to be seen doing so. Who wants to be a the weak minded conformist?

The real bigots are those who fear open-minded enquiry…

It’s sad that it needs to be said, but we don’t train children to question fashionable truths and always look at both sides.

Our advice can be distilled to three words:

Think for yourself. Continue reading Ivy league profs warns of the vice of conformism: “Think for yourself”

Characters, Origins, Identities, Exploits & Legends of Early Patriarchs on Post Flood Earth! GOING WHERE THE EVIDENCE LEADS US, while seriously kicking quackademic ass because it deserves it for suppressing so many historical truths!